Taipei Air Station - 1966 - - - " What you have in the end are memories"......... Photo Courtesy of Richard Reesh.

Saturday, December 27, 2008

MAAG HQ Taiwan Buildings are now AIT Taipei

The building in the center of the photo (the circular grass area) is now one of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) Taipei buildings. When I walked down Lane 134 on a sunny Sunday last fall and attempted to peek inside, a group of security folks rushed out the door and told me to leave the area. I had spent 2 year of my life in and out of those buildings back in the day. Next time I'll take an elevator up a near by building and take pictures.
And here folks, is the same gate and the same building when the occupants were more hospitable, way back in 1967. This was the MAAG HQ building located in the MAAG East Compound.

This photo courtesy of Brenda Kane, MAAG Taiwan 1967.

A Taipei Times article here indicates that the old facility is in the last stage of it's service to the United States government.

Coming soon: Tainan AB - 1958

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Greetings! Sorry that no photography is allowed at the AIT building, but after terrorists blew up U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, and have attempted to blow up many more of our installations since then, U.S. official and semi-official intallations have not been as accessible as they once were. Next time, I suggest you contact the Public Affairs Section of the American Institute in Taiwan and explain what you're up to and what your connection is with the building. AIT Director Stephen Young's father was posted to Taiwan when Mr. Young was a youngster, so we all understand what an important part of people's lives this was. With an appointment, maybe you can even get inside to have a look. But no photos, please, except at authorized angles that don't reveal the building's layout or weak points. After all, al-Qaida surfs the Internet, too...

Lynn Miles said...

Happy New Year!

The photo "Double 10 Archway.jpg" that appears on 2008_04_01_archive.html was taken in the run-up to the Oct 66 celebrations.

It was great to take your tour down Nostalgia Lane. I was a student living a couple hundred meters north of Taipei Air Station in the 60s, just across from National Taiwan University, and used to go "up north" once a month or so and sneak into the west compound (on the few occasions when I was carded, I was unceremoniously turned back) for a burger, fries, and above all real ice cream. I was there from 1962 to 64, again 65 to 67. You talk about retiring in Taiwan. I beat you to it. I've been living here since 2000, and no thoughts of going back to the US, leastwise to stay. I'm living in what would have been called the "boonies" back then, and would have taken maybe 3 hours to reach by bus from Chungli train station, itself more than an hour from Taipei. Now I can be to Gongguan (then spelled Kungkuan) in 45 minutes by highway bus.

Also, your following comment was of interest to me:

The building in the center of the photo (the circular grass area) is now one of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) Taipei buildings. When I walked down Lane 134 on a sunny Sunday last fall and attempted to peek inside, a group of security folks rushed out the door and told me to leave the area. I had spent 2 year of my life in and out of those buildings back in the day. Next time I'll take an elevator up a near by building and take pictures.

I've been in the Presidential Building a number of times, and have been within easy potshot distance of more than one Taiwan president under what in Taiwan might be considered "high-security situations" (as recently as three weeks ago, when my bag wasn't even searched) but the AIT is the only place I have visited in Taiwan where I had to leave my camera and even my cell phone a the door, reminding one of Saigon circa 1968. This is the place where Taiwanese get a whiff of American-style paranoia. Anonymous' comment does little to dispel the notion that post-911 America is little loved, even in a country like Taiwan, where anti-Americanism barely registers when considered on a global scale.
- Lynn Miles

Anonymous said...

I have not had a chance to read all your articles yet but I will do it soon.

I was so surprised that an American can spend so much time introducing my country!!! You make me cry.....:"(. I am going to share what I found with all my friends.

Thank you,
Keiko